Picayune Main St, Inc

200 Highway 11, South
P.O. Box 1656
Picayune, MS  39466
Phone: 601-799-3070
Fax:  601-799-0607
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About Us

Picayune Main Street, Inc.

Picayune became a Main Street community in May 1996.  Main Street is a non-profit organization governed by a board of directors which is responsible for establishing policy, reviewing and monitoring committee work plans in progress. The board participates in fund-raising, membership campaigns and serves on one of the 4 point committees. Picayune Main Street’s primary purpose is the preservation of the historic character and integrity of the downtown commercial and residential districts. Picayune Main Street is committed to sponsoring programs which fulfill charitable goals: Historic preservation, community education and lessening the burden of local government.  Picayune Main Street, Inc. is an organization comprised of a hard working group of volunteers. Our organization is dedicated to the revitalization and beautification of our unique downtown area.

Mission: The mission of Main Street is to preserve the historic character and integrity of the downtown commercial and residential district and to enhance the culture and quality of life through active community involvement.

Vision:  The vision of Main Street is to have a progressive Southern city which offers an excellent quality of life to its residents yet maintains its unique charm. That downtown Picayune will have a unified appearance, streetscape improvement program and additional street lighting that will encourage walking during the day and evening hours. The completion of Highway 11 improvements to allow traffic to move more freely and encourage pedestrian travel, cultural, educational and other programs with a civic center to house such and be used by different organizations. Together with the involvement of the community, have a city which places a high premium on the quality of life of its residents.

Why Main Streets Matter

We all know where our Main Streets are, but do we know what they are and why they matter? Main Streets are the traditional center for social, cultural, and economic activity for their communities. They are the big stage, the core of the community. Our Main Streets tell us who we are and who we were, and how the past has shaped us. We do not go to bland suburbs or enclosed shopping malls to learn about our past, explore our culture, or discover our identity. Our Main Streets are the places of shared memory where the entire community still comes together to live, work, and play.

So what is Main Street?  The phrase has been used to describe everything from our nostalgic past to our current economic woes, but when we talk about Main Street®, we are thinking of real places doing real work to revitalize their communities and preserve their character. Specifically, Main Street® is three things: a proven strategy for revitalization, a powerful network of linked communities, and a national support program that leads the field.

A Proven Strategy: The Main Street Four-Point Approach®

The Main Street Four-Point Approach® is a unique preservation-based organizing framework that enables communities to revitalize downtown and neighborhood business districts by leveraging local assets - from historic, cultural, and architectural resources to local enterprises and community pride. It is a comprehensive strategy that addresses the variety of issues and problems that challenge traditional commercial districts.

Organization

Organization establishes consensus and cooperation by building partnerships among the various groups that have a stake in the commercial district. The most effective Main Street programs get everyone working toward the same goal. With this level of collaboration, your Main Street program can provide effective, ongoing management and advocacy for your downtown or neighborhood business district. Through volunteer recruitment and collaboration with partners representing a broad cross section of the community, your program can incorporate a wide range of perspectives into its efforts. A governing board of directors and standing committees make up the fundamental organizational structure of volunteer-driven revitalization programs. Volunteers are coordinated and supported by a paid program director. This structure not only divides the workload and clearly delineates responsibilities, but also builds consensus and cooperation among the various stakeholders.

Promotion

Promotion takes many forms, but the goal is to create a positive image that will renew community pride and tell your Main Street story to the surrounding region. Promotions communicate your commercial district's unique characteristics, its cultural traditions, architecture, and history and activities to shoppers, investors, potential business and property owners, and visitors.  Promotion, in the Main Street approach, is a multifaceted method to focus community attention and interest on the historic downtown or neighborhood business district. Activities should support the overall revitalization effort and serve as an integral component of economic development strategies. In addition, promotions build a sense of community through special events that invite residents and visitors to socialize in the commercial district through entertaining activities. Special events are a great way to create excitement, fun, and exposure for your commercial district.  If done right, they help educate residents and visitors about the distinctive qualities of your downtown, its cultural traditions, architecture, and history, and rekindle pride in the community. They can also be a source of revenue Economic restructuring committee functions through activities such as retail market analysis, business and real estate development, financial incentive programs, and downtown planning. Marketing Program and Events... All committees concentrate on an overall strategy for marketing your commercial district to portray a favorable image of your district to customers as well as potential business and property owners. Identify “best marketing practices”.

Design

Design means getting Main Street into top physical shape and creating a safe, preserving a place's historic character, inviting environment for shoppers, workers, and visitors. Successful Main Streets take advantage of the visual opportunities inherent in a commercial district by directing attention to all of its physical elements: public and private buildings, storefronts, signs, public spaces, parking areas, street furniture, public art, landscaping, merchandising, window displays, and promotional materials. An appealing atmosphere, created through attention to all of these visual elements, conveys a positive message about the commercial district and what it has to offer. Popular design activities also include instilling good maintenance practices in the commercial district, enhancing the district's physical appearance through the rehabilitation of historic buildings, encouraging appropriate new construction, developing sensitive design management systems, educating business and property owners about design quality, and long-term planning.

Economic Restructuring/Development

Through economic restructuring, we can show you how to strengthen your community's existing economic assets while diversifying its economic base. Successful communities accomplish this by evaluating how to retain and expand successful businesses to provide a balanced commercial mix, sharpening the competitiveness and merchandising skills of business owners, and attracting new businesses that the market can support. Many Main Street programs also achieve success through creative reuse of historic properties. Converting unused or underused commercial space into economically productive property also helps boost the profitability of the district. The goal is to build a commercial district that responds to the needs of today's consumers while maintaining the community’s historic character.

Market Analysis

The strength of most historic commercial districts lies in their owner-operated businesses. These homegrown local businesses distinguish downtowns from competing commercial districts that are filled with chain and franchise formula stores. Main Street programs clearly value downtown entrepreneurs. Filling downtown vacancies with vibrant new businesses is the dream of every revitalization program – Many times it is easier to retain a business than recruit a new one - make a connection with local business owners, develop a strong relationship, and assist them in adjusting to changes and opportunities in the marketplace to keep their businesses strong.

Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Ordinance for Downtown Districts

Local plans, zoning ordinances and other land use regulations may not always work to promote your downtown revitalization goals. In fact, certain zoning use restrictions and parking requirements can often act as barriers to introducing new economic uses to downtown districts. There are strengths and weaknesses of current downtown plans and zoning ordinances and solutions to help communities achieve long-term economic revitalization and design improvement goals.

Pay it Forward Small Business Owners

Always be on the lookout for opportunities to help promote fellow small businesses. By giving business to others, you will get business in return. Successful networkers understand that networking is a two-way street.

Board of Directors

President:
- Bill Edwards
Vice President:
- Roy McManus
Secretary:
- Julie B. Samples
Treasurer:
- Tim Hart
Members:
- Tom Milar
- Beth Lenoir
- Chad Dorn
- Norman Howell
- Ted Barze
- Suzan Wilson
- Jim Howell

Staff

Director:
-
Reba Beebe

Assistant:
-
Jo Scheel

 

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